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A pastor of ours often would say “God is God—and we’re not.” The psalmist may have that idea in mind while musing on God’s eternal nature, creative powers, and skills at surveillance. The psalm also offers a complementary viewpoint: God considers all of us very important. We often say, “We’re...

Eternal parent, keep us mindful of the needs of our neighbors shaken by fear and anxiety, and direct us in ways we can offer your shielding love and care. Amen.


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Lectionary Week
May 28 – June 3, 2018
Scripture Overview

The call of Samuel and the intimate language of the psalmist this week reflect God’s knowledge of and care for each individual. God sees each one of us, no matter where we are in life and no matter how far we might feel from God. Paul seeks to encourage the Corinthians with this same truth. Believers may be afflicted, perplexed, persecuted, beaten down, even killed; but they are never defeated. The power of a personal God flows through them, even if this is not evident to the eyes of the world. We likewise should be personally caring toward those around us. Jesus models this in Mark, demonstrating that showing mercy is more important than following even religious regulations, for mercy is the heart of God.

Questions and Suggestions for Reflection

• Read 1 Samuel 3:1-20. When has a young person in your life or that of someone you know had to face the devastating consequences of a single bad decision? How did that affect your actions and behaviors?
• Read Psalm 139:1-6, 13-18. When have you experienced that life has no guarantees? How did you sense God’s presence in that time?
• Read 2 Corinthians 4:5-12. How do you attempt to be open to seeing Christ in everyone you meet?
• Read Mark 2:23–3:6. When do you, like Jesus, try to be proximate to persons in need? How has that changed your life?

Respond by posting a prayer.

Matt croasmun casula

Jesus is speaking to us . . .

"Many of us are used to the idea that we might speak to God or to Jesus. Maybe at times it feels like shouting into the darkness or whatnot, but it’s not hard to do—at least as an imaginative exercise. What’s harder—even imaginatively—is to try to hear Jesus speaking to us. Are we just making things up? Are we just using Jesus as a puppet to say whatever we want to hear?" READ MORE