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A professor of mine liked to tell the story of his first blind date. He said as they left the house the mother said to her daughter, “Now remember who you are.” That is good advice. The memory of who we are can shape our actions and relationships. In our...

Lord, you have freed us from all that would enslave us. You have passed over our sin and set us free to be your children. Help us to remember who we are and whose we are. Remembering our Passover, may we praise you, serve you, and graciously care for our neighbors. Amen.


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Lectionary Week
August 31—September 6, 2020
Scripture Overview

We move forward in the story of Moses to the climax in Egypt, the tenth plague. God tells the Israelites to prepare for the terrible night to come and establishes the feast of Passover. It is to be an eternal reminder of what God has done for the people. The psalmist praises God for faithfulness and victory, including overthrowing those who would oppress them. Egypt is not mentioned specifically, yet the Passover represents just such a situation. Paul echoes Jesus in summarizing much of the Law in one simple commandment: Love your neighbor as yourself. Jesus provides practical teaching on handling disagreements. Our first responsibility is to go to the other party privately and then include others only as necessary. Gossip and social media are not the ways to handle our disputes.

Questions and Suggestions for Reflection

Read Exodus 12:1-14. How has the story of Passover shaped your faith?
Read Psalm 149. How has God called you to seek freedom from oppression for yourself or others through praise and through action?
Read Romans 13:8-14. What does it mean to consider love a driving force rather than a warm feeling? How does this understanding change the way you act toward yourself and your neighbors?
Read Matthew 18:15-20. When have you participated in or witnessed true reconciliation? How did you see compassion at work?

Respond by posting a prayer.

While several strategies for reopening the world are being discussed, I encourage you—the people of God everywhere—to allow this season to be a formative one during which you can make new discoveries about God and increase your faith. Use this time to embark on a life of prayer, a life of study, and a life of action—involvement in the community.”


 On September 19th, attend Emmaus Ministries International Virtual Gathering.