Come, Lord Jesus, Come

November 29, 2017 by Marti Williams-Martin

The Advent season invites us to shift our focus from a broken world and our broken hearts to something holy and full of promise. We await the Christ Child, God with us, Emmanuel. We thirst to feel God’s presence anew.

We long to experience peace on earth and peace deep within our souls.

For many—including some of our staff—2017 was a year of great distress and discord. Hurricanes, earthquakes, fire, and war forced people from the only homes they have ever known. Words of division fueled hate and fear. Crowds were terrorized and people were killed in countless cities around the world: Aleppo, London, Paris, Barcelona, and in the U.S.: Charlottesville, Nashville, Las Vegas, and Sutherland Springs.

The Upper Room daily devotional was born during another time of crisis. In the 1930s, during the Great Depression. Frances Craig shared a vision with her Sunday School class at Travis Park Methodist Church in San Antonio, Texas. Together, they prayed for a resource that would help families spend a little time with God each day. Their prayers gave birth to the publications and ministries of The Upper Room.

The Upper Room exists for such a time as this, when the world is longing for healing, thirsting to feel God's presence.

We are thankful for prayer partners, friends, and donors who helped us tend to the spiritual needs and challenges of 2017. We could not have done it without the support of our global Upper Room family.

Your prayers and donations connect a longing world to God and community each day, even the hards ones. Thank you.



To support the ministries of The Upper Room, visit our online giving page.


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Starting New Churches in Honduras

The United Methodist Church in Honduras uses El Aposento Elto, the Spanish language version of The Upper Room daily devotional to start new faith communities. They use "An Easy Plan to Use The Upper Room in Small Groups" found in the back of the magazine. As the groups grow, they build critical mass for new church starts.