Advent Prayers

Advent

Join us as we travel through Advent, the season during which we prepare our hearts for Christmas. The same author wrote the prayers within each set, therefore you will experience thematic continuity by praying with a specific set throughout the season. Pray these prayers on your own or with your faith community beginning the First Sunday of Advent.

Advent Prayers by Beth Ann Gaede

Beth Ann Gaede is an Evangelical Lutheran Church in America pastor. She was editor of Alive Now and has worked with dozens of religious authors and publishers. Beth enjoys travel, studying Spanish, canoeing in the wilderness, and fly-fishing for trout.


Advent Prayers by Beth Maria Kane

Maria Kane is an Episcopal priest, writer, and historian of American religion. This fall, she began she began serving as rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Waldorf, MD. Her greatest joy is being godmother to her two young godchildren.


Advent Prayers by Steve Garnaas-Holmes

Steve Garnaas-Holmes is a poet, songwriter, and ordained pastor in the UMC in MA, where he lives with his wife, Beth. He writes a daily reflection, Unfolding Light (unfoldinglight.net), as well as lectionary-based music and worship resources.


Advent Prayers by Cynthia Langston Kirk

Cynthia Langston Kirk is a poet and a minister living in Tucson, Arizona. Cynthia and her husband enjoy spending time with their grandchildren and godchildren. Read more of her writing at piecingstories.com.


Advent Prayers by Beth A. Richardson

Beth A. Richardson has been a part of The Upper Room’s publishing ministry for thirty years, serving both at Alive Now and in web ministry. She is a photographer, writer, and shares life with Jack, a very wise Scottish Terrier, and Arya, a brilliant and clever rescue dog. Follow Beth at betharichardson.org.

Matt croasmun casula

Jesus is speaking to us . . .

"Many of us are used to the idea that we might speak to God or to Jesus. Maybe at times it feels like shouting into the darkness or whatnot, but it’s not hard to do—at least as an imaginative exercise. What’s harder—even imaginatively—is to try to hear Jesus speaking to us. Are we just making things up? Are we just using Jesus as a puppet to say whatever we want to hear?" READ MORE