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Today’s setting feels like déjà vu all over again to those of us who spent the last two days in Isaiah 5. We’re back on the farm. Once again Israel is the vine that God has planted, and the psalmist locates a tender shoot under the watchful eye of a...

Lord, shine on those in pain and grief. Restore us to light and life. Amen.


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Lectionary Week
August 12–18, 2019
Scripture Overview

Isaiah compares the people of Israel to a vineyard that God has planted. However, the grapes that grow there have become wild. There is no justice, no right living in the vineyard so God is considering letting it be destroyed. The psalmist bemoans the state of God’s people using the same metaphor. The vineyard has been overrun, burned, and cut down. The psalmist appeals to God to restore the vineyard. The author of Hebrews presents many more examples of people of faith in past times. All these exemplars now surround us and cheer us on in our life of faith. In Luke’s Gospel, Jesus cautions that following the gospel requires full commitment. For some, this will mean tension in relationships, even within families. Following Jesus is not a commitment of convenience.

Questions and Suggestions for Reflection

Read Isaiah 5:1-7. Recall a time when you lovingly prepared a place. What would prompt you to destroy it?
Read Psalm 80:1-2, 8-19. How has God restored you when you have been at your most vulnerable?
Read Hebrews 11:29–12:2. Who makes up your personal Faith Hall of Fame? How does each person cheer you on in your spiritual journey?
Read Luke 12:49-56. What does it mean for your life of faith for Jesus to have come to bring division?

Respond by posting a prayer.

The role of the prophet is twofold; one, to speak with power and secondly to speak to power. This work on anti-racism does both of those things. The videos, writings and resources are powerful representations of what grace and justice sound like and the orators and writers who approach this work do so with a conviction deeply rooted in gospel. These women and men help us reimagine a prophetic voice in a time such as this. This work is needed.”


View a growing list of resources for the spiritual work of overcoming racism.