After the events on the mountain, Jesus, Peter, John, and James return to their lives. Immediately they are met by a great crowd. A father in agony over his son’s malady approaches and begs for his son to be healed from the seizures that have convulsed him. His heart and soul long for his son’s wellness.

Jesus, fresh from being enveloped by the light of God, heals the son by rebuking a demon. The true identity of Jesus continues to shine through. When he heard, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!” he returned to the people who walked in darkness. That led to his immersion in the great crowds of those who were hungry, thirsty, sick, lonely, and frightened.

Luke doesn’t mention Peter, John, and James in the story of healing, but I can imagine their watching what happens. I imagine their realizing that, despite their desire to stay on the mountain and build three dwellings, they are learning anew and at a deeper level that deep prayer always opens us to loving action. Deep prayer—prayer in which we listen with our whole being and receive the light of Christ—will inevitably lead us, step by step, to the places where we can offer compassion and hope.

Just as Jesus is transfigured, so are we—through our baptism, our Communion, our prayer. We are led by the Friend who goes before us, preparing good works for us to accomplish.

Gracious Friend, may I walk in your ways and continue to praise you not only with my lips but in my life, as I give myself to your service. Amen.

Pray the Scriptures Using Audio Lectio
Read Luke 9:28-43

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Lectionary Week
February 21–27, 2022
Scripture Overview

God’s glory is always revealed, even if never completely. When Moses encounters God on the mountain, his face undergoes a physical transformation as a reflection of God’s greater glory. The psalmist reminds us of how great God is and how even Moses and Aaron bow before God’s throne. Paul refers to the story of Moses, but because of Christ, God’s glory is now more openly revealed. There is no need to wear a covering as Moses did, for Christ reflects openly the divine radiance. Luke recounts the Transfiguration, when the face of Jesus, like that of Moses, begins to shine. God’s voice reinforces the revelation of the Transfiguration, declaring Jesus to be God’s Son and the revelation of God’s glory.

Questions and Suggestions for Reflection

Read Exodus 34:29-35. Consider the ways you provide evidence of your faith. Do you display it for your glory or for God’s?
Read Psalm 99. How do you seek a healthy balance of awe and intimacy in your relationship with God?
Read 2 Corinthians 3:12–4:2. What “veil” separates you from God—a sense of unworthiness, a hardened heart, a lack of understanding?
Read Luke 9:28-43a. Jesus shines with God’s glory, but then he gets back to his work of healing. Consider how God might transform you to do better the work you are already doing for God.

Respond by posting a prayer.

I join many of those who will pray for you as you seek to discern what you are called to be at this moment. May God grant you the courage to fulfill that calling. May we all open our eyes and see the misery, open our ears and hear the cries of God’s people, and, like God through the Lord Jesus Christ, be incarnate amongst them.” 

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