Some people refer to this passage written to the Christians in Ephesus as “Paul’s Prayer.” Paul writes to commend the congregational members’ faith and love toward all the saints, a love widely known. Paul also reassures them that he thanks God for their witness and prays for their growth in the faith. Paul refers to God as the Father of glory, a reminder of God’s glory as expressed in the two psalms from Sunday’s reading.
Paul prays that the eyes of the saints’ hearts be enlightened so that they may know “the hope to which [Christ] has called [them], . . . the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, . . . and the immeasurable greatness of his power for [those] who believe.” This power came to fruition when God raised Jesus from the dead and then raised him in glory to sit at God’s right hand. In fact, Paul reminds his readers that God’s plan of salvation has existed from the beginning and is for all time. His words exponentially expand awareness of God’s power and glory and generate hope.
Some possibilities for reflection are these:
• what “the eyes of your heart” see in this passage and in your own life,
• how you would describe the hope to which you are called,
• how the “spirit of wisdom and knowledge” is at work in you and in your congregation,
• your particular place or gifts (as you understand that/those today) in the body of Christ,
• those saints (individual and/or collective) for whom you give thanks.

Glorious God, enlighten the eyes of my heart so I see you everywhere. Infuse my heart with hope. Amen.


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