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Biblical prophets are less interested in predicting the future
as in declaring the word of God. Elijah, who engaged in
dialogue with Jesus and Moses on the Mount of Transfiguration,
embodies the true prophetic spirit. He symbolized the essence of
prophecy, bringing to visibility those things that often remain
hidden....

Surprising God, open our eyes that we may see you in the face of all whom we meet this day. Amen.


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Lectionary Week
February 20–26, 2017
Scripture Overview

In deep deference and careful obedience, Moses enters the zone of God’s glory, which certifies Moses’ authority. Psalm 99 praises the kingship of Yahweh, while bringing to mind the human agents of God’s rule who facilitate Yahweh’s conversation with the people. The Gospel lesson, like Exodus 24, characterizes what is not fully seen or clearly heard. Jesus is taken up into the zone of God’s glory and so is filled with transcendent authority. Speech about glory points to the assignment of new authority. The epistle reading asserts the authority of the true teachers of the church who rightly present and interpret the scriptural tradition.

Questions and Suggestions for Reflection

• Read Exodus 24:12-18. When did you last experience a life-altering encounter with God?
• Read Psalm 99. Have you ever felt that if God really knew you, you would be hopeless? What changed your mind?
• Read 2 Peter 1:16-21. For the epistle writer, the Transfiguration event focuses more on hearing than on seeing. How do you listen for God’s words?
• Read Matthew 17:1-9. What dark places have you seen brightened by Christ’s presence—through you or others?

Respond by posting a prayer.

Matt croasmun casula

Jesus is speaking to us . . .

"Many of us are used to the idea that we might speak to God or to Jesus. Maybe at times it feels like shouting into the darkness or whatnot, but it’s not hard to do—at least as an imaginative exercise. What’s harder—even imaginatively—is to try to hear Jesus speaking to us. Are we just making things up? Are we just using Jesus as a puppet to say whatever we want to hear?" READ MORE